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Jacky Yu : The best way to safeguard history is to study history

Today’s news, tomorrow’s history. Recently, we took part in an important Hong Kong history.  But, will the enthusiastic find truth in history?  Website oldhkphoto.com founder Jacky Yu believes: “Social movements such as rallies and protests are necessary but an influence on cultural ideologies can exert a lasting impact. Totalitarian powers destroy history. The best way to safeguard history is to study history. Historical events teach us how to negotiate the past and the present and learn how to live today and face the future.”

Handpan musician Chor Lai : I am becoming who I want to be 

International stages gave Chor deeper insights. “Being tops mean nothing.  Musicians express themselves in more ways than one and in different styles. This year, I want to play my music and play it well.  I am happy to see myself doing better every day.”

Barbara Wong: “I have always considered myself a newbie”

Barbara believes that a love potion lasts at most three to six months.  Then, romance turns into daily learning. “One needs to learn how to love and get along with each another,” she added.  “That invigorating feeling of freshness diminishes as the relationship grows.  Everybody has a good side and a bad one.  I tend to delete the bad before sleep and wake up remembering the good.”

Andy Ng Wai-shek: You are your only objet d’art

Seasoned theatre actor, director and drama coach Andy Ng Wai-shek has just been named a Director of the Year from the International Association of Theatre Critics (Hong Kong)’s IATC(HK) Critics Awards. He says, “The one thing that can ever influence you is but yourself. One must live a life and have the drive to pursue meaning because you are your only objet d’art.”

Illustrator Wai Wai: Let me cuddle Yaumatei tenderly

wai wai illustrator

Recalling the days she spent drawing Yau Ma Tei. “The experience was like: when I tried to express my affection, the community would repay me beyond my expectation with more opportunities to use my own skills and brushes to make a record of the face of other Hong Kong communities or even the Yau Ma Tei community.”  She has joined guided tours to familiarise herself with communities in North Point and Wan Chai, for example.  “This book has given me ample chance to understand other Hong Kong communities.  To me, it is like increasing intimacy with Hong Kong.”

Poon Yuen-leung : Making an issue of Hong Kong’s situation? …As you like it

Cross-decade lyricist Calvin Poon Yuen-leung has the following to say about setting a theme for Cantonese-dominant stage performances: ”Creativity does not have to come with purpose. An interesting theme for a performance has to concern the audience, click with them and inspire feelings. This is how audience relations are built.”

Agnes Chow : No regrets for our youth

“I often say to myself: social movement success has never been easy. It is not only because of the Hong Kong political climate. The fight for aspirations takes the determination of many people. It may take a decade or two’s hard work for a chance to succeed.” She believes that people should not dismiss their beliefs because of widespread absurdity. “It would be even more difficult to change Hong Kong’s situation if we turn our backs on our own fundamental beliefs.”

TOMA Miniatures : Rekindling the city’s best memories

Tony has always said that the older he gets the fonder he is of Hong Kong.  “Things in the past are slowly vanishing.  It is a pity.  I hope to contribute my old memories and help bring them back to life.”  Maggie said that micro-scale modelling is not a lucrative business.  “It is a hobby for life.  To me, this hobby carries great significance.”

Chui Tien-you : The Best Side of Life

Tien-you said: “Life seems to have turned sour for many people lately.   Sometimes I have questions on life’s meaning.  Regardless of social issues, we should always look on the bright side of life.  There is love between people.  We need to know about gratitude.” It might sound like a cliché, but there is always light at the end of the tunnel.

Ladies of the night = fallen angels?

Social worker and expressive art therapist Winnie Fung says, “Putting together this exhibition was a journey paved with meanings.  That empowerment is not about having those girls out in the limelight.  Rather, it is more about letting them feel safe to express themselves and embrace dignity and recognition.  They come forward.  That’s what counts.”