Tiffany Yeung : I do what I can however insignificant I am

Tea Hub Tiffany Yeung

Tea Hub is an exciting newcomer. “My husband grew up in the neighbourhood. Over the course of our decade-long relationship before marriage, we met here often because of the agreeable old-town atmosphere. We used to hang out in Chinese tea houses in So Uk.  We even took wedding photos in Shun Ning Road.” She noted that old shops peppered across the entire stretch of Cheung Sha Wan. You will find an old-school record shop here and an alleyway barbershop there. It may sound like a complicated neighbourhood but it is at the same time evolving on its uniqueness of having the best of both the old and new.

Jacky Yu : The best way to safeguard history is to study history

Today’s news, tomorrow’s history. Recently, we took part in an important Hong Kong history.  But, will the enthusiastic find truth in history?  Website oldhkphoto.com founder Jacky Yu believes: “Social movements such as rallies and protests are necessary but an influence on cultural ideologies can exert a lasting impact. Totalitarian powers destroy history. The best way to safeguard history is to study history. Historical events teach us how to negotiate the past and the present and learn how to live today and face the future.”

Handpan musician Chor Lai : I am becoming who I want to be 

International stages gave Chor deeper insights. “Being tops mean nothing.  Musicians express themselves in more ways than one and in different styles. This year, I want to play my music and play it well.  I am happy to see myself doing better every day.”

Illustrator Wai Wai: Let me cuddle Yaumatei tenderly

wai wai illustrator

Recalling the days she spent drawing Yau Ma Tei. “The experience was like: when I tried to express my affection, the community would repay me beyond my expectation with more opportunities to use my own skills and brushes to make a record of the face of other Hong Kong communities or even the Yau Ma Tei community.”  She has joined guided tours to familiarise herself with communities in North Point and Wan Chai, for example.  “This book has given me ample chance to understand other Hong Kong communities.  To me, it is like increasing intimacy with Hong Kong.”

Agnes Chow : No regrets for our youth

“I often say to myself: social movement success has never been easy. It is not only because of the Hong Kong political climate. The fight for aspirations takes the determination of many people. It may take a decade or two’s hard work for a chance to succeed.” She believes that people should not dismiss their beliefs because of widespread absurdity. “It would be even more difficult to change Hong Kong’s situation if we turn our backs on our own fundamental beliefs.”

Hong Kong-born mime actor Gaffer Tsui: Leave it or Love it

In 2017, Tsui and Michael created 24hr Restricted Area – a lamentation over social dissatisfaction with a trial run in a San Po Kong dance studio. “People are pretty hung up about Hong Kong’s current affairs. Without a theatre or director, we just wanted to get things off our chests.” The trial run ended after two shows to a very small audience. Then the mime duo found out on the internet about the 42nd Festival of monodrama and mime in Serbia. With 24hr Restricted Area under their belts, they enrolled and came out tops among 64 international mime teams, becoming one of the four finalists and subsequently taking home the Best Mime Award. As Asia’s first ever Best Mime winner, Tsui and Michael quite naturally became a Hong Kong’s pride for a time. “The award does not make me feel like I was some big shot. It makes me a more confident mime actor and leads me to think about promoting mime development in Hong Kong.”

Kit Man kicking up a quiet storm

Kit Man created Kickass Type (勁揪體), a font set of 6,000 Traditional Chinese characters.
Call it ugly. Call it weird. He has the determination, to say the very least.
Skint but undeterred, he said: “The last thing I want is to see we lose our spirit. I want to restore it.”
What is there to restore? Hong Kong people’s “kick ass” spirit, that is.

Indie Folk Serrini vows to become a superstar

Independent singer-songwriter Serrini is by no means a rainbow chaser.
About today’s Hong Kong society, she said: I don’t care. I’m busy making ends meet.”
She vows to become a diva in her own right, a superstar who is unknown to the average housewife.
She knows her role, not as an opinion leader for her peers but one that stimulates thoughts through her works.
The Hong Kong spirit she demonstrates manifests the statement of the generation.